Fifth win confirms Corbett's dominance

James Corbett stamped himself as the best modern day rifle shooter in the country claiming an unprecedented fifth Australian Queens Prize victory in Brisbane yesterday.

A member of Benalla Rifle Club in Victoria, James scored an impressive 99 bullseyes from 100 shots at the 41st National Rifle Championships.

He has more than 20 state and national Queens titles to his credit as well as a gold medal at the Delhi Commonwealth Games.

James posted 65 centre bulls on his way to victory in the three-day match shot over 10 ranges, from 300 to 1000 yards.

Three shooters finished two shots down for the tournament. Jim Bailey from Holsworthy in Sydney clinched second with the leading centre-bull count of 67.

Gilliam Webb-Enslin, who shoots with the Pacific Club in Brisbane, was third with 53 centre bulls and Geoff Grosskreutz from Brisbane Rifle Club was fourth with 43 centres.

Brisbane shooter James Spence won B Grade with a score of 493.46 and Bruce Nardi from Pacific Rifle Club took out C Grade with 449.22.

Cairns shooter David McNamara was a clear winner of the F Open Queens Prize for rifles with telescopic sights, scoring an aggregate 594.55.

Top Hobart shooter Bob Pedersen added another Queens Prize to his extensive collection with a two shot win in the strong F Standard scope class. He finished with 585.42 to beat Clermont shooter Nick Williamson, who finished with 583.52.

Kim O’Loghlen from Natives Rifle Club in Brisbane scored a decisive victory in the historic Royal Kaltenberg Challenge Cup. He was the only shooter to score a possible 75 in the challenging 15-shot match over 1000 yards.

The cup is a head-to-head shootout among the top 30 competitors over five days at the national championships.

Mark Thurtell from Orange, NSW, set the early pace with a one-shot victory in the two-day President’s Match over Jim Bailey from Holsworthy.

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